Entrance Requirements

There are no entry requirements for this module, which is open to all who are interested in learning about Islam and feel they may benefit.

Aims

The course aims to:

  • Develop a critical understanding of methods, procedures, current issues, debates and materials appropriate to the study of Islam.
  • Encourage an enquiring, analytical and creative approach and to encourage self-confidence in independent thinking, critical self awareness and self-evaluation.

Outcomes

By the end of the module the students should:

  • Have gained knowledge and understanding of the themes, issues, and debates within the study of Islam.
  • Gained a critical understanding of the application and uses of the methods, practices or materials involved in the study of Islam.
  • Nurtured new insights into cross-cultural issues.

Teaching and learning methods

The module will be taught by lectures, audio-visual material and discussions and will incorporate religious, historical and anthropological perspectives. Students will be invited to give class presentations on a particular topic in the syllabus.

Method of Assessment

Students will be assessed through written classroom tasks, notes, reports, oral presentations and participation in discussions.

Course work for summative assessment will consist of written work (essays). Some guidelines will be given for writing assignments. Essays that fail to come within the minimum and maximum word limits by 25% will incur a 10% penalty. You should have attended at least 50% of the meetings in order to qualify for assessment.

Submission and return dates for Coursework

Two essays of 1,500 words each must be submitted. Essays will be returned after being marked.  

Module Content 

Introduction 

Block 1: Pre-Islam, Early Islam and the Life of Prophet Muhammad – 3 sessions –Historical and geographical overview of Arabia before and during the time of Muhammad. Details about the life of Muhammad and the development of the early Muslim Community.

Bosworth C., 1993, “The historical background of Islamic civilisation” in Islamic Civilisation Savory R.M. (ed.). Cambridge University Press

Esposito, J., 1991, Islam the Straight Path. (chapters. 1&2) Oxford: Oxford University Press

Lunde, P., 2003, Islam: A brief History. London: Dorling Kindersley

Armstrong K., 1991, Muhammad. London: Victor Gollancz LTD.

Block 2: Qur’an, Sunna and Hadith – 3 sessions –

Major themes in the Qur’an; Interpretation and exegesis; Hadith science and classification

 

The Holy Qur’an - English translations by M. Asad, M. Pickthall, Yusuf Ali, etc.

Al-Hadith Sahih-al-Bukhari transl. by M.M. Khan; Miskhat al-Masabih trans. J.Robson; Muwatta of Imam Malik trans. A. AbderRahman

Haleem M.  1998. Understanding the Qur’an: Themes and Style. London: IB Tauris

Robinson, N. 1996. Discovering the Qur’an. London: SCM Press LTD

Calder, N., Mojaddedi, J., Rippin, A. 2003.  Classical Islam: A Sourcebook of Religious Literature. London: Routledge

Cook, M. 2000. The Koran: A very short introduction. O.U.P.

Watt, M. & Bell R., 1970.  Major Themes in the Qur’an. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press

Azami M. 1992.  Studies in Early Hadith Literature.

 

Block 3: Islamic Law – 2 sessions –

The main schools of law; questions about ethics, morality, penalties and contemporary perspectives on jurisprudence.

 

Khare, R.S. 1999 Perspectives of Islamic law and Society. Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.

Coulson, N.J. 1964 A History of Islamic Law. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press

Kamali, M.H. (1991) Principles of Islamic Jurisprudence Cambridge: Islamic Texts Society

Al-Qaradawi, Y. (undated).  The Lawful and the Prohibited in Islam. Indianapolis: American Trust Publication

Abou El Fadl, K., 2003, Speaking in God’s Name. Oxford: Oneworld.

 

Block 4: Women and Islam – 2 sessions –

Muslim women in Islamic history and religious discourse; gender issues and contemporary debates on shifting roles and veiling.

 

Stowasser, B.F. 1994. Women in the Qur’an, Traditions, and Interpretation. Oxford University Press.

Ahmed, L.  1992.   Women and Gender in Islam. New Haven: Yale University Press.

Roald, A.S. 2001. Women in Islam: The Western Experience. London: Routledge.

Ask, K. & Tjomsland, M. 1998.  Women and Islamization. Oxford: Berg.

Wadud-Muhsin, A.  1992.  Qur’an and Woman. Kuala Lumpur: Penerbit Fajar Bakti SDN. BHD.

 

Bibliography

Abbot N.  1985 Aishah the beloved of Muhammad

Al-Azmeh, A. 1993. Islams and Modernities. London: Verso

Allouche, A. 1987. “Arabian Religions” in M. Eliade (ed.) The Encyclopaedia of Religion, vol.1 pp. 363-6

Armstrong K. 1994.  A History of God. London: Mandarin

Armstrong K. 2000. The Battle for God.  London: HarperCollins Publishers.

Esposito J. 1992. Women in Muslim Family Law. New York: Syracuse University Press.

Fluehr-Lobban, C. 1994.  Islamic Society in Practice. University Press of Florida.

Hallaq, W.B. 1997. A History of Islamic Legal Theories. Cambridge University Press.

Hitti, P.  1970. History of the Arabs. London: MacMillan Press.

Kepel, G. 1997. Allah In The West. Cambridge: Polity Press.

Momen, M. 1985. An Introduction to Shi’i Islam. New Haven: Yale University Press

Rahman, F. 1982. Islam and Modernity. Chicago.

Riley-Smith J. 1992, What were the Crusades

Roberts, R., 1990, The Social Laws of the Quran, London: Curzon Press

Rumi, J. 1982. The Mathnawi (translated by Nicholson R.). London: Luzac

Said, E. 1978.  Orientalism. London: Penguin Books

Schacht, J. 1982.  An Introduction to Islamic Law. Oxford: Clarendon Press.

Schimmel, A.  1979    Mystical Dimensions of Islam

Sheikh Muhammad Ri’fat Uthman, 1995. The Laws of Marriage in Islam. London: Dar Al Taqwa

Sheikh, M.S. 1962. Islamic Philosophy. London: The Octagon Press

Watt, M. & Bell, R. 1970. Introduction to the Qur’an. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press

Yamani M (ed.) 1996. Feminism and Islam. Reading: Ithaca Press

Journal of Qur’anic Studies. SOAS

 

Coursework Titles

1- Critically analyse a major theme of the Qur’an.

Abdel Haleem, M., 1999, Understanding the Qur’an, Themes and Style, London I.B. Tauris

Watt, M. & Bell R., 1970, Major Themes in the Qur’an, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press

Robinson, N., 1996, Discovering the Qur’an, London: SCM Press LTD

Rahman, F., 1979, Major Themes of the Qur’an. Maryknoll

Calder, N., Mojaddedi, J., Rippin, A. 2003, Classical Islam: A Sourcebook of Religious Literature, London: Routledge (chapt. 1)

2- Critically examine the historical and cultural trends in Qur’anic interpretation and exegesis.

Calder, N., Mojaddedi, J., Rippin, A. 2003.  Classical Islam: A Sourcebook of Religious Literature, London: Routledge (chapt 5)

Rippin A. 1993.  Muslims, vol. 2, London: Routledge. (chapt.5&6)

Robinson, N., 1999, Islam: a Concise Introduction, Richmond: Curzon Press (pp.66-71)

Watt, M. & Bell R., 1970, Major Themes in the Qur’an, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press

3- Compare and contrast Qur’anic text and Hadith text with reference to at least two main topics. (These can be issues relating to prayer, fasting, ablutions, giving alms, marriage, inheritance, business transactions, belief, food laws, etc.)

4- Discuss the significance of Muhammad in the daily life of Muslims. (To what extent does the personal life of Muhammad influence the personal life of Muslims today? Why do Muslims aspire to emulate Muhammad?)

Rippin A., 1990, Muslims, vol. 1, London: Routledge. (chapt.3)

Robinson, N., 1999, Islam: a Concise Introduction, Richmond: Curzon Press (Chapts. 8 &10)

5- Critically examine the role and function of ritual practice with reference to the contemporarily context of Muslims living in N. America and Europe.

Rippin A. 1990.  Muslims, vol. 1. London: Routledge. (chapt.7)

Rippin A. 1993.  Muslims, vol. 2. London: Routledge. (chapt.8)

Robinson, N. 1999. Islam: A Concise Introduction. Richmond: Curzon Press (chapt.7)

6- Critically comment on the following statement:

“Like Judaism but unlike Christianity, Islam emphasises “orthopraxy”, right behaviour or practice, rather than orthodoxy, right belief. In other words, one participates in the meaning of being a Muslim through ritual action, not merely through a profession of faith.”

Winter, M., 1995, “Islamic Attitudes Towards the Human Body” in Religious Reflections on the Human Body, (ed) Jane Marie Law. Bloomington: Indiana University Press. 

7- Critically examine the emergence and early development of the schools of law.

Rippin A., 1990.  Muslims, vol. 1. London: Routledge. (chapt.6)

Robinson, N., 1999. Islam: a Concise Introduction. Richmond: Curzon Press (Chapt.12).

Savory, R.M., 1993. “Law and Traditional Society”, in Islamic Civilisation, ed. R.M. Savory. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 

8- Critically analyse the principle differences between Sunni and Shi’ite Islam.

Robinson, N. 1999, Islam: a Concise Introduction. Richmond: Curzon Press (chapt.13)

Esposito, J., 1991, Islam the Straight Path. Oxford: Oxford University Press. (pp. 109-113)

Richard, Y., 1995, Shi’ite Islam. Oxford: Blackwell Publishers

9- Critically examine the historical origins of Sufism.

Rippin A., 1990.  Muslims, vol. 1. London: Routledge (chapt.9)

Rahman, F., 1979.  Islam. Chicago: University of Chicago Press (chap. 8)

Esposito, J., 1991. Islam the Straight Path. Oxford: Oxford University Press. (pp. 101-109)

Baldick, J., 1989. Mystical Islam. London: IB Tauris

10- Critically examine the role and status of Muslim women in religious text and discourse.

Stowasser, B.F. 1994. Women in the Qur’an, Traditions, and Interpretation. Oxford University Press.

Ahmed L.  1992.   Women and Gender in Islam. New Haven: Yale University Press (Part 2)

 11- Critically examine contemporary debates on Muslims and pluralism.

Safi O. 2003. Progressive Muslims: On Justice, Gender and Pluralism. Oxford: Oneworld Publications (Part III)

 12-Critically assess the influence of the Qur’an and Hadith on the development of Islamic art.

Websites:

http://www.arches.uga.edu/~godlas

http://www.quran.org.uk

http://www.isim.nl

or

search Google for any topic/subject.

This syllabus has been approved by the Islamic Studies Academic Board at the Muslim College for the academic year 2016/17. 

CONTACT AND FURTHER INFORMATION

 For further information regarding the programme or other courses and events at the Muslim College, please contact:

The Muslim College, 20 – 22 Creffield Road, Ealing, London W5 3RP

Tel: +44 (0)20 8992 6636  / Fax: +44(0)20 8993 3648

E-mail: mbenotman@muslimcollege.ac.uk,

amdrammeh@muslimcollege.ac.uk

registrar@muslimcollege.ac.uk

Web: www.muslimcollege.ac.uk